PNF and Movement 2019; 17(3): 471-480
https://doi.org/10.21598/JKPNFA.2019.17.3.471
The Correlations between a Forward Head Posture and the Endurance and Maximal Voluntary Contraction of the Deep Neck Flexor, Neck Pain, and the Changed Position of the Mandible
Him Seok, P.T., B.S.⋅Sang-Yeol Lee, P.T., Ph.D1†⋅Young-Hoon Kim, P.T., Ph.D2
Haeundae Jaseng Oriental Hospital
1Department of Physical Therapy, Kyungsung University
2Department of Physical Therapy, Masan University
Correspondence to: Sang-Yeol Lee (sjslh486@ks.ac.kr)
Received: October 25, 2019; Revised: November 17, 2019; Accepted: November 21, 2019; Published online: December 31, 2019.
© Korea Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Association. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: This study examined the correlations between a forward head posture and the endurance and maximal voluntary contraction of the deep neck flexor, neck pain, and the changed position of the mandible.
Methods: The subjects of this study were 50 male and female adults who work at a desk for at least four hours a day. The head–spine angle was photographed with a camera, and the endurance and maximal voluntary contraction of the deep neck flexor and the changed position of the mandible were measured using pressure biofeedback. The Neck Disability Index was used to measure neck pain. To examine the correlations between a forward head posture and the endurance and maximal voluntary contraction of the deep neck flexor as well as the changed position of the mandible, a Spearman’s correlation analysis was conducted. The statistical significance was set at 0.05.
Results: A forward head posture and the endurance of the deep neck flexor showed a statistically significant positive correlation, and a forward head posture and neck pain showed a statistically significant negative correlation. In addition, the endurance of the deep neck flexor and neck pain showed a statistically significant negative correlation.
Conclusion: The results of this study show that a forward head posture and the endurance of the deep neck flexor were correlated; in addition, a forward head posture and neck pain were correlated. Therefore, enhancing the endurance of the deep neck flexor can assist in correcting an imbalanced forward head posture, which can reduce neck pain.
Keywords: Deep neck flexors endurance, Forward head posture, Neck pain


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