PNF and Movement 2021; 19(2): 251-260
https://doi.org/10.21598/JKPNFA.2021.19.2.251
Change of Craniovertebral Angle and Scapula Alignment in Adults with Forward Head Posture by Shoulder and Abdominal Stabilization Exercise
Jae-Hyun Kim, P.T., M.S.⋅Min-Hyung Rhee, P.T., Ph.D.1†
Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, Catholic University of Pusan
1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital
Correspondence to: Min-Hyung Rhee (minhyung@gmail.com)
Received: August 1, 2021; Revised: August 10, 2021; Accepted: August 13, 2021; Published online: August 31, 2021.
© Korea Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Association. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: This study aimed to adjust the craniovertebral angle and shoulder alignment through shoulder and abdominal stabilization exercises in adults with a forward head posture.
Methods: The study participants were 29 adults with a forward head posture, and they were randomly divided into the following groups: 14 participants in a combined exercise group that used shoulder and abdominal stabilization exercises and 15 participants in a shoulder exercise group that used just shoulder stabilization exercises. The participants performed the stabilization exercises for 30 minutes per day, three times a week for five weeks.
Results: There were significant differences in the craniovertebral angle after intervention in the shoulder stabilization exercise group (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in the craniovertebral angle and location of the right root of the spine and both inferior angles before and after intervention in the shoulder and abdominal stabilization exercise group (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference in the location of the right root of the spine and the left inferior angle between the groups at the post-test (p < 0.05), and there was a larger change in the shoulder and abdominal stabilization exercise group.
Conclusion: There was a significant difference in the craniovertebral angle and a partially significant difference in shoulder alignment before and after intervention in both groups.
Keywords: Forward head posture, Shoulder stabilization exercise, Abdominal stabilization exercise, Craniovertebral angle


This Article

e-submission

Archives