PNF and Movement 2021; 19(3): 391-399
https://doi.org/10.21598/JKPNFA.2021.19.3.391
Effects of a Notebook Computer Supporter on Biomechanical Characteristics in Wrist Joint Muscles of Healthy Young Adults
Sung-Ryong Ma, O.T., Ph.D.⋅Chiang-Soon Song, O.T., Ph.D.
Department of Occupational Therapy College of Natural Science and Public Health and Safety, Chosun Univerisity
Correspondence to: Chiang-Soon Song (grsong@chosun.ac.kr)
Received: November 20, 2021; Revised: December 2, 2021; Accepted: December 3, 2021; Published online: December 31, 2021.
© Korea Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Association. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: As laptop use increases throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and its use outside of traditional workstations proliferates, it is imperative to expand the limited research available regarding ergonomic exposure. This study aimed to identify the effects of a laptop supporter on biomechanical characteristics in the wrist joint muscles of healthy young adults.
Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study design with thirty-four healthy young adults as participants. They conducted a typing exercise performed under two different conditions, which were with and without a notebook computer supporter. This study measured the biomechanical characteristics of the muscles of the wrist joints including the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), the flexor carpi radialis (FCR), the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), and the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU). Measurements were taken three times: before typing, immediately after typing for 30 minutes with a supporter, and immediately after typing for 30 minutes without a supporter. The statistical method to compare the three different measurement conditions was the repeated measures ANOVA.
Results: The participants showed significantly different levels of dynamic stiffness in both the FCU before typing and immediately after 30 minutes of typing with a supporter, and showed significantly different levels of dynamic stiffness in the FCR before typing and immediately after 30 minutes of typing with a supporter. The dynamic stiffness level immediately after 30 minutes of typing without a supporter was significantly different than that immediately after 30 minutes of typing with a supporter. However, the muscle tone was not s ignificantly different among the three different conditions.
Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that a laptop supporter used to correct the eye level of the electronic screen increases the dynamic stiffness of the wrist joint flexors, so it is necessary to consider the neutral position of the wrist joint during typing.
Keywords: Biomechanics, Muscle, Notebook peripherals, Young Adults, Wrist joint


This Article

e-submission

Archives