PNF and Movement 2022; 20(1): 73-81
https://doi.org/10.21598/JKPNFA.2022.20.1.73
Comparison of Grip Force, Coordination, and Dexterity Between Dominant and Non-dominant Hand According to Gender
Chan-Hyun Park, PT, MS.⋅Ho-Hee Son, PT, PhD.
Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan
Correspondence to: Ho-Hee Son (sonhh@cup.ac.kr)
Received: February 20, 2022; Revised: March 11, 2022; Accepted: March 17, 2022; Published online: April 30, 2022.
© Korea Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Association. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: The aim of this study was to present specific criteria for setting goals for hand rehabilitation by comparing the degree of difference in grip force, coordination, and dexterity between the dominant and non-dominant hand according to gender.
Methods: We recruited 100 healthy adults in their 20s and 30s. A handheld digital dynamometer was used to evaluate the grip force of each of the dominant and non-dominant hand, a chopsticks manipulation test was used to evaluate coordination, and the Purdue Pegboard test was used to evaluate agility.
Results: In all subjects, the grip force, coordination, and dexterity showed statistically significant difference (p <0.01) between the dominant and non-dominant hand. In the comparison according to gender, both male and female dominant and non-dominant hands showed statistically significant differences in grip force, coordination, and dexterity (p <0.01). In the comparison according to grip force, there was a statistically significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant hand, and men showed stronger result values in both hands compared to women (p <0.01). In the comparison according to coordination, there was no statistically significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant hand in men and women (p >0.05). In the comparison according to dexterity, there was a statistically significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant hand, and women were shown to be faster in performance time with both hands, compared to men (p <0.01).
Conclusion: Differences according to gender exist in grip force and dexterity but not coordination, and differences between dominant and non-dominant hand exists across all measurements. The results suggest setting a recovery goal according to dominance and gender during rehabilitation of hand function.
Keywords: Dominant hand, Non-dominant hand, Grip force, Coordination, Dexterity


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