PNF and Movement 2022; 20(1): 91-101
https://doi.org/10.21598/JKPNFA.2022.20.1.91
The Effect of Cycle Ergometer Exercise Inducing Movement of the Affected Side on Knee Joint Function after Total Knee Arthroplasty
Eun-Ji Choi, P.T M.S.⋅Sang-Yeol Lee, P.T., Ph.D.2†
1Department of Physical Therapy, Graduated school of Kyungsung University
2Department of Physical therapy, Kyungsung University
Correspondence to: Sang-Yeol Lee (sjslh486@ks.ac.kr)
Received: March 14, 2022; Revised: April 1, 2022; Accepted: April 9, 2022; Published online: April 30, 2022.
© Korea Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Association. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cycle ergometer exercise inducing movement of the affected side on knee joint function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).
Methods: The primary experiment was conducted on 19 members of the cycle ergometer exercise group to measure the muscle activity of the rectus femoris, hamstring, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles during cycle ergometer exercise that induced the affected side’s movement. In the second experiment, after receiving physiotherapeutic intervention for 30 min, the general bicycle exercise group and cycle ergometer exercise group performed the corresponding exercise for 15 min, 5 times per week, for 2 weeks. The ROM, muscle strength, pain, and balance were then measured and compared between the two groups.
Results: In the results of the primary experiment, cycle ergometer exercise inducing movement of the affected side showed a significantly larger increase in the activity of leg muscles (rectusfemoris, hamstring, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) on the affected side than the general bicycle exercise (p <0.05). In the second experiment, the cycle ergometer exercise group showed a significantly larger increase in range of movement of affected side knee flexion and muscle strength of affected side knee flexion, knee extension, and plantarflexion than the general bicycle exercise (p <0.05). No significant between-group difference was observed in pain and balance before or after the intervention (p >0.05).
Conclusion: Cycle ergometer exercise inducing movement of the affected side increases use of the muscles around the affected side knee joint after TKA more than general bicycle exercise and produces better effects for enhancing muscle strength. The application of cycle ergometer exercise inducing movement of the affected side is expected to reduce the patients’ unbalanced use during the early postoperative period and help them to quickly return to normal daily life through rapid muscle strength recovery.
Keywords: Cycle ergometer, Knee function, Total knee arthroplasty


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